Pat Timmons

aMMAzing Celebration of Art

Pat Timmons
aMMAzing Celebration of Art

aMMAzing Celebration of Art

In the past few days the Music Modernization Act passed through the Senate and is well on it’s way to get signed and become law. If this is your first time hearing about the Music Modernization Act (MMA), then take note and read ahead.


The MMA will benefit three main types people working in the music industry, songwriters, artists, and studio professionals. Here’s how:


“For Songwriters

  • Create a new and transparent collection entity to ensure that songwriters always get paid for mechanical licenses when digital services use their work.

  • Help ASCAP and BMI secure fairer rates for their songwriters.

  • Establish fair compensation for songwriters when the government sets rates.

For Artists

  • Close the "pre-1972 loophole" so that digital services will pay legacy artists the compensation they deserve.

  • Establish fair compensation for artists when the government sets rates.

For Studio Professionals

  • Give copyright protection to producers and engineers for the first time in history."

The Recording Academy has been at the forefront of this fight. Not only are they educating the general public of this pursuit, they have also been recruiting their members to be advocates for this change in music, prompting them to call their representatives, educate their peers, and live and breathe music. The Academy teaches us a very strong lesson: if a group of passionate people come together with the same goal, it can be done.


The world has transformed into a digital space, so now the way we pay artists also has to change. We buy music differently, so lets pay musicians differently. This act helps musicians, but will this prompt further change to other art mediums? What will be the direct effect of the MMA? Where as consumers of music and art will we see the changes? I am excited to find out. My first guess is that a lot more music will be shared by a lot more creative and intelligent minds, now that the government is recognizing music as a career.